Color has powerful meaning and using it matters

Color has powerful meaning and using it matters

 September 03, 2017 |  Views:62 |  Posted by: John Marx |  Article Tags: 

We see color every day or shades of grey for those that have color blindness. Color is an important part of our lives for forming opinions, feeling emotion, and conveying a message to your audience. Today we will look at what colors typically mean and how they can help you get your message across to your target audience.

 
Red
Warmth
Energy
Aggression
Excitement
Youthful
Bold
Urgency
Power
Blood
Passion
Anger
Green
Natural
Peaceful
Balance
Growth
Health
Finance
Ethical
Affluence
Pink
Feminine
Tranquil
Loving
Blue
Integrity
Professional
Success
Calm
Sadness
Trustworthy
Dependable
Yellow
Intellect
Optimism
Cheer
Happiness
Sunshine
Fun
Orange
Community
Social
Adventure
Friendly
Welcoming
Fire
Food
Appetite
Cheerful
Confidence
Purple
Intuitive
Creative
Imaginative
Mystery
Royalty/Luxury
White
Simplicity
Clarity
Clean
Purity
Fresh
Innocence
Good
Grey
Balance
Neutral
Formal
Black
Strong
Formal
Elegance
Powerful
Death
Wealth
Fearful
Sophisticated
Classic
 
Circle Square Triangle

Looking at the above chart you can see that color can convey a lot of meaning. The first item a person often sees with your company is the logo of your company. What color are you using in your logo and is it conveying the right information to your audience? When it comes to color 93% of consumers have stated that their purchasing decisions are made on visual perceptions. 85% of consumers cite color as their main reason for buying a product or service.

Beyond color though what is there? You have shapes and shapes aligned with the right colors convey a complete message.

  • Circles
    • Community
    • Unity
    • Complete
  • Squares
    • Balance
    • Professionalism
    • Security
  • Triangles
    • Power
    • Masculinity
    • Stability

When we started this article, we mentioned that not everyone sees in color. Does your color choice work well in a non-color way as well? It should if you want to hit the largest audience possible. Those with color blindness are a larger audience than you might realize. 1 in 12 men and 1 in 200 women have a form of being color blind. Make certain that you have enough contrast between your colors that everyone can benefit. This is one reason a standard for government websites are that they comply with section 508 or people with disabilities.

Speaking of websites there's a lot of thought that needs to go into creating your own website to hit the largest audience possible. We know you've put thought into the overall layout, functionality, content, and the structure of the menu. What many don't put a lot of thought into is the overall color choices. This for our clients beyond content is the largest consumer of time. The wrong choices in color can distract rather than bring your audience into your marketing. The look-and-feel of your site your audience will quickly see; it will be the color that helps them decide to stay and want to learn more.

When it comes to choosing your colors, there is no magic bullet. You can choose blue and orange and be done. You need to make an informed decision. This decision need to reflect not only the company brand itself but the audience you are targeting. Look at your intended demographic age, gender, culture, financial status, and interests. A source we often use to look at colors a brand uses is https://brandcolors.net/.

<a href='mailto:john@jm2marketing.com'>John Marx</a>
John Marx
CEO / Owner
john@jm2marketing.com

John has been actively involved with technology since computers first came out in the late 1970's. He developed businesses and games as a teenager which still hold his interest. John started out with basic and assembly language, and progressed to Pascal, Delphi, C, C++, and COBOL in his college days. Currently he uses Visual Basic (VB), PHP and C# (his preferred) as part of ASP.Net. Since 1995 John has concentrated his work to Internet web pages and is a strong advocate for pushing web technologies to their maximum potential. John continually writes code in HTML (HTML5), CSS (CSS3, SASS, and LESS), jQuery, and uses SQL Server to store all of the information he writes. John is a strong advocate for agile development practices, and pushes the use of Internet standards in every application he writes and supports.

John is proud that the team at JM2 Webdesigners is committed to following the company standards of honesty, value, and customer satisfaction.